Science Fiction's Finest Haircuts

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Posts tagged Star Wars

8 notes &

With the beginning of a new month, and the return of wintery weather, I’ve decided that it’s time to give the blog a bit of a theme. Today (April first), marks the beginning of the first time I’ll try to chain a few posts together. 
The main point of this is to see how well a pet theory holds up. I’d been considering the prominence of androids and cyborgs in science fiction, and a couple of things occurred to me all at once:

Androids: It seems almost universally the case that androids are either made to be as human as possible or deliberately made to look as human as possible so that they can blend in with humans. As a result, they should have really down-to-earth hairstyles that will help them blend in. 
See: Data, The Terminator, Ash (Alien), human-form-cylons (not pictured due to spoiler-risk) and Roy Batty (Blade Runner).

[Much as Roy Batty might seem an exception, we must remember him as a product of the eighties]



Cyborgs: Being a mixture of man and machine, cyborgs don’t have to try and look human. For reasons I can’t begin to imagine, they’re often bald. 
See: Robocop, Darth Vader, Cyborg (Justice League) and Lobot (Star Wars). 

Over the next week or so, I’ll look into some of the more interesting haircuts that mechanical and partially mechanical characters have. 
The first of these, pictured above, is Lobot. Lobot is fairly straightforward, being an administrative aide whose mind is linked directly with the network of computers that operate the cloud city. As in the case of Robocop, Lobot had cyborgdom (and the accompanying cyborg-pattern-baldness) thrust upon him, poor lad. 
At the same time, I bet he gets killer bass with that biotech-headband.

With the beginning of a new month, and the return of wintery weather, I’ve decided that it’s time to give the blog a bit of a theme. Today (April first), marks the beginning of the first time I’ll try to chain a few posts together. 

The main point of this is to see how well a pet theory holds up. I’d been considering the prominence of androids and cyborgs in science fiction, and a couple of things occurred to me all at once:

Androids: It seems almost universally the case that androids are either made to be as human as possible or deliberately made to look as human as possible so that they can blend in with humans. As a result, they should have really down-to-earth hairstyles that will help them blend in. 

See: Data, The Terminator, Ash (Alien), human-form-cylons (not pictured due to spoiler-risk) and Roy Batty (Blade Runner).

[Much as Roy Batty might seem an exception, we must remember him as a product of the eighties]


Cyborgs: Being a mixture of man and machine, cyborgs don’t have to try and look human. For reasons I can’t begin to imagine, they’re often bald. 

See: Robocop, Darth Vader, Cyborg (Justice League) and Lobot (Star Wars). 

Over the next week or so, I’ll look into some of the more interesting haircuts that mechanical and partially mechanical characters have. 

The first of these, pictured above, is Lobot. Lobot is fairly straightforward, being an administrative aide whose mind is linked directly with the network of computers that operate the cloud city. As in the case of Robocop, Lobot had cyborgdom (and the accompanying cyborg-pattern-baldness) thrust upon him, poor lad. 

At the same time, I bet he gets killer bass with that biotech-headband.

Filed under android cyborg replicant blade runner robocop star wars darth vader baldness science fiction haircuts sci-fi hair

6 notes &

Very few science fiction hairstyles have managed to become iconic. In face, that category is probably limited to few examples outside the charming orange-haired Leeloo (Dallas Multipass) and princess Leia.
While The Fifth Element gets a bit of a free pass when it comes to strange future fashions (thank you John Paul Gaultier), it’s hard not to question the style choices for Leia’s hair. I suppose, if one were inclined to analysis, Leia’s strange hair could be seen as an inversion of the Darth Vader baldness.
Where Vader’s head is cradled in the cold, unfeeling metal of his gloss-black helmet, Leia’s head is padded on either side by her soft brown tresses. It’s a classic juxtaposition of the natural and the machined, good and evil.
The dark side of the force and the light side.
The hair and the bald. 

Very few science fiction hairstyles have managed to become iconic. In face, that category is probably limited to few examples outside the charming orange-haired Leeloo (Dallas Multipass) and princess Leia.

While The Fifth Element gets a bit of a free pass when it comes to strange future fashions (thank you John Paul Gaultier), it’s hard not to question the style choices for Leia’s hair. I suppose, if one were inclined to analysis, Leia’s strange hair could be seen as an inversion of the Darth Vader baldness.

Where Vader’s head is cradled in the cold, unfeeling metal of his gloss-black helmet, Leia’s head is padded on either side by her soft brown tresses. It’s a classic juxtaposition of the natural and the machined, good and evil.

The dark side of the force and the light side.

The hair and the bald. 

Filed under star wars sci-fi science fiction princess leia darth vader

1 note &

Star Crash is a beautiful (see also: horrific) attempt to rip off Star Wars ahead of the film’s release in Italy. Its original name was Scontri Stellari Oltre la Terza Dimensione (Stellar Clashes Beyond the Third Dimension), but for reasons I’ll never understand the title was deemed unsuitable for use overseas. 
I’ll be honest, when I sat down to watch Star Crash, I wasn’t told anything about it other than that the whole point of the movie was to ape Star Wars. In reality, the film is sort of beautifully confusing. It’s only an hour and a half long, but somehow it feels as though it goes on fo days. 
It also contains such wonderful lines as:


I’ll scan him, with my computer waves.



Time for a little robot chauvinism. 



Computer… Stop the flow of time!


Half way through the story, David Hasselhoff shows up, lightsabre in hand. It’s really wonderful. Another day, I’ll feature the Hasselhair, but for now, the evil Emperor of the Galaxy’s fantastic Dracula-mullet-thing will have to do.
There’s a bad guy called Zarn Arth. It’s amazing.

Star Crash is a beautiful (see also: horrific) attempt to rip off Star Wars ahead of the film’s release in Italy. Its original name was Scontri Stellari Oltre la Terza Dimensione (Stellar Clashes Beyond the Third Dimension), but for reasons I’ll never understand the title was deemed unsuitable for use overseas. 

I’ll be honest, when I sat down to watch Star Crash, I wasn’t told anything about it other than that the whole point of the movie was to ape Star Wars. In reality, the film is sort of beautifully confusing. It’s only an hour and a half long, but somehow it feels as though it goes on fo days. 

It also contains such wonderful lines as:

I’ll scan him, with my computer waves.

Time for a little robot chauvinism. 

Computer… Stop the flow of time!

Half way through the story, David Hasselhoff shows up, lightsabre in hand. It’s really wonderful. Another day, I’ll feature the Hasselhair, but for now, the evil Emperor of the Galaxy’s fantastic Dracula-mullet-thing will have to do.

There’s a bad guy called Zarn Arth. It’s amazing.

Filed under Star Crash Star Wars sci-fi science fiction haircut hair Hasselhoff